Tom Henighan

I'm an artificial intelligence engineer at Beehive AI. Before that I was a PhD student at Stanford.

Some projects and selected publications can be found below.

Email  /  Scholar  /  LinkedIn

Projects

I worked on a few projects while at Stanford while taking classes such as natural language processing with deep learning and convolutional neural networks for visual recognition.

Spatial Control of Style Blending in Neural Style Transfer
Tom Henighan
CS231n: Convolutional Neural Networks for Visual Recognition , 2017  
PDF / Poster / Examples

Implemented an algorithm for neural style transfer which takes in one or more "style" images (usually paintings) and a "content" image (usually a photograph) and renders the content image in the "style" of the style image. Inspired by the work of Gatys et al, my implementation allows for spatial control of blending multiple styles, allowing for smooth transitions from one style to another. See some examples here.

Iterative Attention Networks for Question Answering
Tom Henighan
CS224n: Natural Language Processing with Deep Learning , 2017  
PDF / Poster / Example Predictions

Designed a deep learning model which takes in a paragraph from wikipedia and then answers a question based on that paragraph. Trained on the SQuAD dataset. My poster was recognized as outstanding by the course staff. Check out some example answers produced by the model here .

Predicting Bill Votes in the House of Representatives
Tom Henighan, Scott Kravitz
CS229: Machine Learning, 2015
Interactive Visualization / PDF / Poster

We created a model for predicting how a member of congress would vote not based on their voting history, but on their party and their campaign contributions. Check out the interactive visualization which shows funding by district and economic sector.

Healthcare Marketplace
Xinlu Huang, Tom Henighan
Bayes Hackathon, 2016  
Github

Participated in the 24-hour 2016 Bayes impact hackathon. Our goal was to make it easy for someone to compare different public healthcare plans based on their zip, address, and their current doctor. We built a little webapp as a prototype.

PhD Research

I did my PhD in physics department at Stanford. Under my advisor, David Reis, I studied atomic motion in solids using the Linac Coherent Light Source.

Dissertation: Couplings of Phonons to Light and One Another Studied with LCLS
Tom Henighan, advisor: David Reis
Stanford University Department of Physics , 2016  
Defense / Thesis

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first x-ray source of its kind, providing a combination of atomic-scale wavelengths, temporally-short pulses, and high-flux. This allows for previously impossible time-domain measurements of phonons. My collaborators and I demonstrated techinques that not only allow for measurement of phonon dispersions and lifetimes, but momentum-resolved phonon-phonon coupling.

Control of two-phonon correlations and the mechanism of high-wavevector phonon generation by ultrafast light pulses
T Henighan, M Trigo , M Chollet, J N Clark, S Fahy, J M Glownia, M P Jiang, M Kozina, H Liu, S Song, D Zhu, and D A Reis
Physical Review B Rapid Communications , 2016  
Phys Rev B / arXiv

We showed that in Fourier-Transfor Inelastic X-ray Scattering (FTIXS) measurements on high-quality crystals, the pump laser couples to high-wavevector phonons primarily through second-order processes.

Generation mechanism of terahertz coherent acoustic phonons in Fe
T Henighan, M Trigo , Stefano Bonetti , P Granitzka, D Higley, Z Chen, M P Jiang, R Kukreja, A Gray, A H Reid, E Jal, M C Hoffmann, M Kozina, S Song, M Chollet, D Zhu, P F Xu, J Jeong, K Carva, P Maldonado, P M Oppeneer, M G Samant, S P Parkin, D A Reis , and H A Durr
Physical Review B Rapid Communications , 2016  
Phys Rev B / arXiv

We were able to make time-resolved measurements of acoustic phonons with frequencies up to 3.5 THz in iron using LCLS.

Fulbright Research

I spent a year at Delft Institute of Technology (TUDelft) as a Fulbright Scholar doing biophysics research in the lab of Cees Dekker.

Magnetic Forces and DNA Mechanics in Multiplexed Magnetic Tweezers
I De Vlaminck*, T Henighan*, M T J van Loenhout, D Burnham, C Dekker *authors contributed equally
PLOS ONE , 2012  
PLOS ONE

We demonstrated ways of parallelizing single-molecule measurements with magnetic tweezers, allowing for simultaneous measurement of hundreds of molecules instead of just a few.

Highly Parallel Magnetic Tweezers by Targeted DNA Tethering
I De Vlaminck, T Henighan, M T J van Loenhout, I Pfeiffer, J Huijts, J W J Kerssemakers, A J Katan, A van Langen-Suurling, E van der Drift, C Wyman, C Dekker
Nano Letters , 2011  
Nano Lett

Patterning tether sites of the DNA strands allowed for furter improvement in parallelization capacity.

Undergraduate Research

I did my bachelors at The Ohio State University where I was advised by Prof Sooryakumar. I majored in engineering physics with a focus in electrical engineering.

Undergraduate Thesis: Patterned magnetic traps for magnetophoretic assembly and actuation of microrotor pumps
T Henighan, D Giglio, A Chen, G Vieira, and R Sooryakumar
Applied Physics Letters , 2011  
App Phys Lett / Undergraduate Thesis

We demonstrated a magnetically controlled microfluidic pump. The pump consisted of a magnetic microsphere trapped by the magnetic field gradient produced by a patterned paramagnetic film on the floor of the microchannel. Time-varying magnetic fields positioned and spun the microsphere, activating the pump.

Manipulation of Magnetically Labeled and Unlabeled Cells with Mobile Magnetic Traps
T Henighan, A Chen, G Vieira, A J Hauser, F Y Yang, J J Chalmers, and R Sooryakumar
Biophysical Journal , 2011  
Biophys / Dancing Microspheres / Patent

Using patterned paramagnetic disks of micron scale diameter and 10s of nm thickness and externally applied weak (~10's of Oe) magnetic fields, we could control the position of magnetic microspheres on a lab-on-chip device.


thanks jon!